Schachfiguren gedrechselt mit Elfenbeinbesatz um 1900

21.05.2017 - 13.05.2018

Chess in Asia

a varied and beautiful world of chess

European and Asian chess presumably had common roots – but they went different ways. Chess in Asia surprises with a variety of board and figure types as well as rule variants. In Asia as well, Chess found its way into the coffee and tea houses, can be seen colourful living chess performances, with travelling professional gamblers and in private conviviality. Immerse yourself in a strange and beautiful chess world.

Special Exhibitions

With financial support from the Halberstadt branch of the Sparkasse bank, the Ströbeck Chess Museum opened two new exhibition rooms, one of which was to be particularly reserved for special exhibitions, on 17th May 2009. With regularly changing exhibitions on a variety of topics, the museum can examine the history of chess and, of course, the history of chess in Ströbeck, in much more detail as new discoveries are constantly being made.
Chess Customs Museum

17.05.2015 - 15.05.2016

Chess Fever in the Coffee House

Since the 17th century, coffee houses have been a popular meeting place for people from the worlds of culture, society and politics, with conversations being held, business dealings being made and games being played. Frequenting coffee houses is, therefore, how regular people, primarily in England and France, were able to access chess. Eventually, by the 19th century, the game was incredibly popular in all coffee houses across Europe. The exhibition gave special insight into the pulsating world of chess in coffee houses, where champions and novices met with interested onlookers watching over their shoulders.

18.05.2014 - 30.04.2015

The Jester on the Chessboard

Humour in chess is as diverse as the game itself and begins with the names of the pieces. For example, the ‘bishop’ is called ‘le fou’ (the jester) in France. From caricatures, poems, political satire to everyday scenes from the world of chess and witty chess matches to play through, this exhibition presented chess players’ diverse senses of humour. A particularly special treat was the 1925 Russian film Chess Fever.

08.09.2013 - 30.04.2014

Chess Legends

Ströbeck belongs to a network of eleven Cultural Villages of Europe, spanning eleven European countries. This special exhibition presented famous chess masters from three of these nations… people who have become chess icons in their homelands. 09.09.2013 - 13.11.2013 Emanuel Lasker (24.12.1868 - 1.1.1941 | Germany) was the second official world chess champion and, until now, the only German to hold the title. This was a title he held for 27 years (1894 – 1921), which is longer than any other person has held it. 16.11.2013 - 12.02.2014 Max Euwe (20.5.1901 - 26.11.1981 | Netherlands) was the fifth person to win the world chess championship, a title he held from 1935 to 1937 and was president of FIDE, the world chess federation, from 1970 to 1978. He sparked an enormous enthusiasm for chess in his home country. Numerous Dutch chess teams were founded in 1935. 15.02.2014 - 30.04.2014 Paul Keres (7.1.1916 - 5.6.1975 | Estonia) was one of the best players of the 20th century. He never won a world championship but set a record during his run in that he won matches against nine titleholders from Capablanca to Fischer. His image featured on the Estonian five-kroon note and Paul Keres memorial tournaments still take place today in Estonia and Canada.

20.05.2012 - 30.08.2013

The ‘Other’ Chess – the History of

Chess Variants

This exhibition was hot on the heels of different varieties of chess developed since the game’s inception and tried to shed a little light on their origins. Chess players experimented with different shaped boards, different figures and how they move, different line-ups and rules of play. The biggest motivation for this throughout history has always been to expand the possibilities by increasing the difficulty level and, with it, to challenge understanding. Plus, on 30th November 2012, we received a replica of the courier chessboard depicted in the Lucas van Leyden painting for our exhibition. The board was provided by the Austrian company Brettspielprofi GesBR.

15.05.2011 - 30.04.2012

Ströbeck, Village of Chess -

From Yesterday to Today

In 2011, Ströbeck celebrated “1,000 years of chess”. To mark the event, the Chess Museum arranged a series of readings and a special exhibition. Houses, parks and people featured in old illustrations and photographs were displayed alongside images from today in order to demonstrate just how Ströbeck has changed through time.

16.05.2010 - 30.04.2011

Games and Gambling in the 18th Century

A special “Sachsen-Anhalt and the 18th Century” exhibition as part of the “Human Images” topic for the year This exhibition showed how society viewed itself by means of the daily practice of playing. At the beginning of the century, children did not ‘play’ as such, as any ‘game’ they were involved in was intended to prepare them for the challenges they would face in society later in life. Only as education developed did people start to understand the true nature of children, including their right to enjoy free, informal play. For adults, knowing the rules to certain games was just part of daily life. The aristocracy, in particular, identified themselves as gamblers as they often carelessly squandered substantial sums of money. The bourgeoisie, however, created a kind of balance by promoting the values of sensibility and thrift and saw their standing in parlour games as one which didn’t require money or utensils to succeed. They valued skill much more highly.

04.09.2010 - 07.11.2010

Village Portraits - The People are the

Village

A photographic exhibition of the Ströbeck Chess Museum in the Halberstadt Urban Museum. Thirteen photographers from England, France, Belgium, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic. When the Dutch village of Wijk aan Zee declared itself a European Cultural Village in 1999, two events were arranged – one which featured ten visits from villages that would later belong to the “Cultural Villages of Europe” network, to which Ströbeck also belongs, and another encompassing ten other projects for amateur and professional film makers, thinkers, youths, seniors, sculptors, musicians, as well as for village experts, playwrights and photographers. The project for photographers was a competition called “Village Portraits“. The brief was: “Portray a village through the medium of the people who live there.” Some of the photographs entered in this competition were displayed as part of this exhibition.

17.05.2009 - 26.02.2010

“They play with simplicity and honour”

A special “Sachsen-Anhalt and the 18th Century” exhibition as part of the “Day-to-Day Worlds” topic for the year In the 18th century, the international chess world made efforts to perfect and professionalise the game, and the game was the subject of much scientific and philosophical discussion. The chess world didn’t always look favourably on the headstrong village of Ströbeck, as the inhabitants insisted on playing chess by their own rules. The exhibition showed the conflict areas between the developmental tendencies in the 18th century chess scene and the contrary and unique method of playing in Ströbeck.
Deutsch MAP

22.05.2016 - 14.05.2017

Caissas Sisters - Women and Chess 

Insofar as it was a form of entertainment and an opportunity for the sexes to meet informally, women playing chess had a firm place in literature and art until the late 18th century. However, women had been excluded from the scientific development of chess and the most prominent locations where chess was played by the elite, such as the coffee houses. With the emancipation movement at the end of the 19th century, women were both able to gain access to knowledge and live life how they wanted to and, so, returned to the world of chess.
Foto: Ian Cook
Schachfiguren gedrechselt mit Elfenbeinbesatz um 1900

Special Exhibitions

With financial support from the Halberstadt branch of the Sparkasse bank, the Ströbeck Chess Museum opened two new exhibition rooms, one of which was to be particularly reserved for special exhibitions, on 17th May 2009. With regularly changing exhibitions on a variety of topics, the museum can examine the history of chess and, of course, the history of chess in Ströbeck, in much more detail as new discoveries are constantly being made.
MENU

21.05.2017 - 13.05.2018

Chess in Asia

a varied and beautiful world of chess

European and Asian chess presumably had common roots – but they went different ways. Chess in Asia surprises with a variety of board and figure types as well as rule variants. In Asia as well, Chess found its way into the coffee and tea houses, can be seen colourful living chess performances, with travelling professional gamblers and in private conviviality. Immerse yourself in a strange and beautiful chess world.

17.05.2015 - 15.05.2016

Chess Fever in the Coffee House

Since the 17th century, coffee houses have been a popular meeting place for people from the worlds of culture, society and politics, with conversations being held, business dealings being made and games being played. Frequenting coffee houses is, therefore, how regular people, primarily in England and France, were able to access chess. Eventually, by the 19th century, the game was incredibly popular in all coffee houses across Europe. The exhibition gave special insight into the pulsating world of chess in coffee houses, where champions and novices met with interested onlookers watching over their shoulders.

18.05.2014 - 30.04.2015

The Jester on the Chessboard

Humour in chess is as diverse as the game itself and begins with the names of the pieces. For example, the ‘bishop’ is called ‘le fou’ (the jester) in France. From caricatures, poems, political satire to everyday scenes from the world of chess and witty chess matches to play through, this exhibition presented chess players’ diverse senses of humour. A particularly special treat was the 1925 Russian film Chess Fever.

08.09.2013 - 30.04.2014

Chess Legends

Ströbeck belongs to a network of eleven Cultural Villages of Europe, spanning eleven European countries. This special exhibition presented famous chess masters from three of these nations… people who have become chess icons in their homelands. 09.09.2013 - 13.11.2013 Emanuel Lasker (24.12.1868 - 1.1.1941 | Germany) was the second official world chess champion and, until now, the only German to hold the title. This was a title he held for 27 years (1894 – 1921), which is longer than any other person has held it. 16.11.2013 - 12.02.2014 Max Euwe (20.5.1901 - 26.11.1981 | Netherlands) was the fifth person to win the world chess championship, a title he held from 1935 to 1937 and was president of FIDE, the world chess federation, from 1970 to 1978. He sparked an enormous enthusiasm for chess in his home country. Numerous Dutch chess teams were founded in 1935. 15.02.2014 - 30.04.2014 Paul Keres (7.1.1916 - 5.6.1975 | Estonia) was one of the best players of the 20th century. He never won a world championship but set a record during his run in that he won matches against nine titleholders from Capablanca to Fischer. His image featured on the Estonian five-kroon note and Paul Keres memorial tournaments still take place today in Estonia and Canada.

20.05.2012 - 30.08.2013

The ‘Other’ Chess – the History of

Chess Variants

This exhibition was hot on the heels of different varieties of chess developed since the game’s inception and tried to shed a little light on their origins. Chess players experimented with different shaped boards, different figures and how they move, different line-ups and rules of play. The biggest motivation for this throughout history has always been to expand the possibilities by increasing the difficulty level and, with it, to challenge understanding. Plus, on 30th November 2012, we received a replica of the courier chessboard depicted in the Lucas van Leyden painting for our exhibition. The board was provided by the Austrian company Brettspielprofi GesBR.

15.05.2011 - 30.04.2012

Ströbeck, Village of Chess -

From Yesterday to Today

In 2011, Ströbeck celebrated “1,000 years of chess”. To mark the event, the Chess Museum arranged a series of readings and a special exhibition. Houses, parks and people featured in old illustrations and photographs were displayed alongside images from today in order to demonstrate just how Ströbeck has changed through time.

16.05.2010 - 30.04.2011

Games and Gambling in the 18th Century

A special “Sachsen-Anhalt and the 18th Century” exhibition as part of the “Human Images” topic for the year This exhibition showed how society viewed itself by means of the daily practice of playing. At the beginning of the century, children did not ‘play’ as such, as any ‘game’ they were involved in was intended to prepare them for the challenges they would face in society later in life. Only as education developed did people start to understand the true nature of children, including their right to enjoy free, informal play. For adults, knowing the rules to certain games was just part of daily life. The aristocracy, in particular, identified themselves as gamblers as they often carelessly squandered substantial sums of money. The bourgeoisie, however, created a kind of balance by promoting the values of sensibility and thrift and saw their standing in parlour games as one which didn’t require money or utensils to succeed. They valued skill much more highly.

04.09.2010 - 07.11.2010

Village Portraits - The People are the

Village

A photographic exhibition of the Ströbeck Chess Museum in the Halberstadt Urban Museum. Thirteen photographers from England, France, Belgium, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic. When the Dutch village of Wijk aan Zee declared itself a European Cultural Village in 1999, two events were arranged – one which featured ten visits from villages that would later belong to the “Cultural Villages of Europe” network, to which Ströbeck also belongs, and another encompassing ten other projects for amateur and professional film makers, thinkers, youths, seniors, sculptors, musicians, as well as for village experts, playwrights and photographers. The project for photographers was a competition called “Village Portraits“. The brief was: “Portray a village through the medium of the people who live there.” Some of the photographs entered in this competition were displayed as part of this exhibition.

17.05.2009 - 26.02.2010

“They play with simplicity and honour”

A special “Sachsen-Anhalt and the 18th Century” exhibition as part of the “Day-to-Day Worlds” topic for the year In the 18th century, the international chess world made efforts to perfect and professionalise the game, and the game was the subject of much scientific and philosophical discussion. The chess world didn’t always look favourably on the headstrong village of Ströbeck, as the inhabitants insisted on playing chess by their own rules. The exhibition showed the conflict areas between the developmental tendencies in the 18th century chess scene and the contrary and unique method of playing in Ströbeck.
MAP Deutsch Foto: Ian Cook

22.05.2016 - 14.05.2017

Caissas Sisters - Women and Chess 

Insofar as it was a form of entertainment and an opportunity for the sexes to meet informally, women playing chess had a firm place in literature and art until the late 18th century. However, women had been excluded from the scientific development of chess and the most prominent locations where chess was played by the elite, such as the coffee houses. With the emancipation movement at the end of the 19th century, women were both able to gain access to knowledge and live life how they wanted to and, so, returned to the world of chess.