Gemälde von Plaisant: Ströbecker bewachen ihren legendären Schachlehrer im Jahr 1011

The Home of Chess

Legend has it that, in the 11th century, in the year 1011 AD at the very earliest, the Bishop of Halberstadt placed a prisoner of war in the Ströbeck watchtower. The local farmers, who were watching over him, treated him well and, in return, he taught them how to play chess. Since then, the game has been passed down from generation to generation in our village.
The first mention of Ströbeck in connection with chess dates back to 1515. The strange manner of playing in Ströbeck, which remained until the early 20th century, indicates that chess must have come to the village much earlier. The Ströbeck chess tradition is possibly just as old as the game of chess itself in Europe.
Under the pseudonym Gustavus Selenus, Augustus the Younger, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, published the first German-language chess book in 1616. He dedicated an entire chapter to Ströbeck chess, causing the village to become renowned across Europe. Five chapters of H.J.R. Murray’s 1913 book, A History of Chess, also called “the bible of chess”, also talk about Ströbeck and the methods of play here. Furthermore, articles about Ströbeck have been appearing in the international chess press since the 19th century. Indeed, chess authors, journalists, writers and chess masters have come to Ströbeck and reported on their experiences. Since the start of the 20th century, movies, television and radio documentaries have also been made.
The Ströbeck Chess Association was founded in 1883, closely followed by Germany’s first ever women’s chess association in 1886. This was when Ströbeck began to open itself up to the international rules of the game, which made it possible for chess conventions and tournaments to be held in the village. Since 1960, Ströbeck has played host to the annual chess tournament each May, which also doubles as a well-loved village festival. Famous chess players have visited the village for memorable simultaneous matches and both national and international championships, such as the German Sparkassen-turnier, a tournament held between branches of the Sparkasse bank, and the German Chess Federation’s International German Youth Chess Championships have taken place in Ströbeck.
Zeichnung Hermann Lüders 1890: Schachturnier im Gasthaus zum Schachspiel
Illustration by Hermann Lüders, 1890: Chess tournament in the “Gasthaus zum Schachspiel” (Chess Inn) in Ströbeck.
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Gemälde von Plaisant: Ströbecker bewachen ihren legendären Schachlehrer im Jahr 1011

The Home of

Chess

Legend has it that, in the 11th century, in the year 1011 AD at the very earliest, the Bishop of Halberstadt placed a prisoner of war in the Ströbeck watchtower. The local farmers, who were watching over him, treated him well and, in return, he taught them how to play chess. Since then, the game has been passed down from generation to generation in our village. The first mention of Ströbeck in connection with chess
dates back to 1515. The strange manner of playing in Ströbeck, which remained until the early 20th century, indicates that chess must have come to the village much earlier. The Ströbeck chess tradition is possibly just as old as the game of chess itself in Europe.
Under the pseudonym Gustavus Selenus, Augustus the Younger, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, published the first German-language chess book in 1616. He dedicated an entire chapter to Ströbeck chess, causing the village to become renowned across Europe. Five chapters of H.J.R. Murray’s 1913 book, A History of Chess, also called “the bible of chess”, also talk about Ströbeck and the methods of play here. Furthermore, articles about Ströbeck have been appearing in the international chess press since the 19th century. Indeed, chess authors, journalists, writers and chess masters have come to Ströbeck and reported on their experiences. Since the start of the 20th century, movies, television and radio documentaries have also been made.
The Ströbeck Chess Association was founded in 1883, closely followed by Germany’s first ever women’s chess association in 1886. This was when Ströbeck began to open itself up to the international rules of the game, which made it possible for chess conventions and tournaments to be held in the village. Since 1960, Ströbeck has played host to the annual chess tournament each May, which also doubles as a well-loved village festival. Famous chess players have visited the village for memorable simultaneous matches and both national and international championships, such as the German Sparkassen-turnier, a tournament held between branches of the Sparkasse bank, and the German Chess Federation’s International German Youth Chess Championships have taken place in Ströbeck.
Zeichnung Hermann Lüders 1890: Schachturnier im Gasthaus zum Schachspiel
Illustration by Hermann Lüders, 1890: Chess tournament in the “Gasthaus zum Schachspiel” (Chess Inn) in Ströbeck.
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