Lebendschach: die schwarzen Figuren Schachmusical: Szene mit Preußenkönig Friedrich II.

Homage Ritual

The practice of giving a silver chess set to the landgrave when he took office, ensuring that the villagers of Ströbeck would continue to receive their privileges, has endured since the Middle Ages. On his 1651 inspection tour, Great Elector Friedrich Wilhelm of Brandenburg thanked the villagers by gifting them a chess board with artistic inlay work and silver chessmen. The board can still be seen today in the Ströbeck Chess Museum, as can a letter from Wilhelm I, the Prussian king who eventually became the first German emperor, in which he thanks the village for the gift sent to mark his coronation in 1861.

Match Against Travellers

If a traveller ever stopped in Ströbeck, the village magistrate would challenge them to a game of chess. This also happened to Prussian king Friedrich II (Frederick the Great) in 1773 when, on a journey from Halberstadt to Goslar, he stopped in Ströbeck to change horses. It is reported that he won two games, but then complained about the manner in which the game was played in the village. The village magistrate’s retort was that he had won the first game because he was his King and the second because he was his guest. Now the real game could begin. The king lost the third game and is said to have ridden away angrily.
Hochzeitsbrauch 2007: Bürgermeister spielt gegen Bräutigam Schach Lebendschach: schwarzer König ergibt sich weißem Springer

Wedding Ritual

In the 17th century, young men had to play chess against the village magistrate before marrying their brides. If the groom lost, he would have to pay a fine into the municipal coffers. This tradition was reinstated in 2007 and future husbands have played for ‘permission’ to marry their bride ever since.

Living Chess

The game, introduced in 1688, with living chessmen in beautiful costumes, is still an attraction at the chess and village festivals. The living chess ensemble, a fine representation of Ströbeck, has made numerous appearances across Germany and the rest of Europe. » living chess ensemble website

Die Schachtradition

The villagers of Ströbeck have been maintaining their chess-playing traditions in many different ways for more than a thousand years and have developed many of their own customs related to the game. Homage Ritual | Match Against Travellers | Wedding Ritual | Living Chess | Chess at School | Chess Association | Chess Tournaments | Chess Festivals | Chess Musical | Chess Museum
altes Foto: Schüler im Schachunterricht niederländische Mannschaft beim Mai Schachturnier

Chess at School

Chess was introduced as an examined subject in the village school in the year 1823. Even today, it’s still a compulsory subject for pupils aged 8-10 at the Dr Emanuel Lasker primary school in Ströbeck. There is also an optional chess club. As an added incentive, a competition in which the prize is a special Ströbeck chess board with chessmen has been held since 1823. To mark each winner’s victory, chess symbols and the dates they won are drawn on the houses. Other annual traditional events are the Emanuel Lasker Memorial Tournament, held just before Christmas, which pupils can enter by themselves, and the Family Chess Competition held on the first Sunday of Advent, which pits teams of two; always comprising children aged 6-16 and a member of their family, against each other.

Chess Association

The Ströbeck Chess Association, founded in 1883, holds further extra-curricular chess competitions and tournaments, which are a constant feature of village life. There have even been chess conventions held in Ströbeck since 1885. The Association’s annual international May tournament doubles as Ströbeck’s village festival. The living chess ensemble makes an appearance and the pupils are awarded their winners’ chess sets. The German Sparkasse Chess Championship is held every second September and, in 2011, 2013 and 2015, the German Chess Federation’s International German Youth Chess Championships took place in Ströbeck.
Schachmusical: Szene mit Guncellin dem Schachlehrer von 1011 Schachfiguren als Wildtiere wie Hirsch, Hase und andere

Chess Musical

When Ströbeck hosted the » Cultural Villages of Europe in 2006, over 100 villagers and friends took part in the two-hour musical “Ströpker Zeitsprünge (Ströbeck leaps in time), which tells the story of the history of chess in the village. Even at the “1,000 years of chess” celebrations in 2011, countless villagers took part in the musical “Guncellin 2011 – So könnte es gewesen sein” (Guncellin 2011 – it could have been this way), which, again, recounted the history of chess up to the present day. The village brought in playwright Jürgen Westphal and composer Christoph Zwiener to write the pieces.  

Chess Museum

The Chess Museum contains a great deal of references to Ströbeck’s chess-playing traditions and the history of chess, such as the Great Elector’s board from 1651, costumes worn by the living chess ensemble and the 1861 letter from the King of Prussia. Also exhibited are the history of chess abroad, different versions of chess played by different peoples, chess-based art and unusual variants of the game for you to try out, as well as a variety of other special exhibitions that change annually.
Museum Musicalszene: Bischof von Halberstadt in Ströbeck Deutsch MAP Chess Customs
Lebendschach: die schwarzen Figuren Schachmusical: Szene mit Preußenkönig Friedrich II.

Homage Ritual

The practice of giving a silver chess set to the landgrave when he took office, ensuring that the villagers of Ströbeck would continue to receive their privileges, has endured since the Middle Ages. On his 1651 inspection tour, Great Elector Friedrich Wilhelm of Brandenburg thanked the villagers by gifting them a chess board with artistic inlay work and silver chessmen. The board can still be seen today in the Ströbeck Chess Museum, as can a letter from Wilhelm I, the Prussian king who eventually became the first German emperor, in which he thanks the village for the gift sent to mark his coronation in 1861.

Match Against Travellers

If a traveller ever stopped in Ströbeck, the village magistrate would challenge them to a game of chess. This also happened to Prussian king Friedrich II (Frederick the Great) in 1773 when, on a journey from Halberstadt to Goslar, he stopped in Ströbeck to change horses. It is reported that he won two games, but then complained about the manner in which the game was played in the village. The village magistrate’s retort was that he had won the first game because he was his King and the second because he was his guest. Now the real game could begin. The king lost the third game and is said to have ridden away angrily.
Hochzeitsbrauch 2007: Bürgermeister spielt gegen Bräutigam Schach Lebendschach: schwarzer König ergibt sich weißem Springer

Wedding Ritual

In the 17th century, young men had to play chess against the village magistrate before marrying their brides. If the groom lost, he would have to pay a fine into the municipal coffers. This tradition was reinstated in 2007 and future husbands have played for ‘permission’ to marry their bride ever since.

Living Chess

The game, introduced in 1688, with living chessmen in beautiful costumes, is still an attraction at the chess and village festivals. The living chess ensemble, a fine representation of Ströbeck, has made numerous appearances across Germany and the rest of Europe. » living chess ensemble website

Die Schachtradition

The villagers of Ströbeck have been maintaining their chess-playing traditions in many different ways for more than a thousand years and have developed many of their own customs related to the game. Homage Ritual | Match Against Travellers | Wedding Ritual | Living Chess | Chess at School | Chess Association | Chess Tournaments | Chess Festivals | Chess Musical | Chess Museum
altes Foto: Schüler im Schachunterricht niederländische Mannschaft beim Mai Schachturnier

Chess at School

Chess was introduced as an examined subject in the village school in the year 1823. Even today, it’s still a compulsory subject for pupils aged 8-10 at the Dr Emanuel Lasker primary school in Ströbeck. There is also an optional chess club. As an added incentive, a competition in which the prize is a special Ströbeck chess board with chessmen has been held since 1823. To mark each winner’s victory, chess symbols and the dates they won are drawn on the houses. Other annual traditional events are the Emanuel Lasker Memorial Tournament, held just before Christmas, which pupils can enter by themselves, and the Family Chess Competition held on the first Sunday of Advent, which pits teams of two; always comprising children aged 6-16 and a member of their family, against each other.

Chess Association

The Ströbeck Chess Association, founded in 1883, holds further extra-curricular chess competitions and tournaments, which are a constant feature of village life. There have even been chess conventions held in Ströbeck since 1885. The Association’s annual international May tournament doubles as Ströbeck’s village festival. The living chess ensemble makes an appearance and the pupils are awarded their winners’ chess sets. The German Sparkasse Chess Championship is held every second September and, in 2011, 2013 and 2015, the German Chess Federation’s International German Youth Chess Championships took place in Ströbeck.
Schachmusical: Szene mit Guncellin dem Schachlehrer von 1011 Schachfiguren als Wildtiere wie Hirsch, Hase und andere

Chess Musical

When Ströbeck hosted the » Cultural Villages of Europe in 2006, over 100 villagers and friends took part in the two-hour musical “Ströpker Zeitsprünge (Ströbeck leaps in time), which tells the story of the history of chess in the village. Even at the “1,000 years of chess” celebrations in 2011, countless villagers took part in the musical “Guncellin 2011 – So könnte es gewesen sein” (Guncellin 2011 – it could have been this way), which, again, recounted the history of chess up to the present day. The village brought in playwright Jürgen Westphal and composer Christoph Zwiener to write the pieces.  

Chess Museum

The Chess Museum contains a great deal of references to Ströbeck’s chess-playing traditions and the history of chess, such as the Great Elector’s board from 1651, costumes worn by the living chess ensemble and the 1861 letter from the King of Prussia. Also exhibited are the history of chess abroad, different versions of chess played by different peoples, chess-based art and unusual variants of the game for you to try out, as well as a variety of other special exhibitions that change annually.
Musicalszene: Bischof von Halberstadt in Ströbeck MENU MAP Deutsch