altes Foto vom Schachmuseum als es noch Bauernhof war

How it All Began

Having a chess museum in Ströbeck was first discussed in the 1920s, but there was no fitting location in the village at that time. Ultimately, in the 1980s, both the derelict annexe of the chess tower and the tower itself were renovated for this very purpose. Our tireless supporters began the reconstruction works in 1985 so that they would be completed in time for the 1991 Chess and Village Festivals. Josef Cacek, retired chess teacher from the Dr Emanuel Lasker primary school, painstakingly put all the exhibitions for the museum together and presented them there upon completion. In the years that followed, he shared his extensive knowledge about the exhibition and recounted the history of Ströbeck’s unique chess traditions with enthusiasm. Under his leadership, the chess museum became a much loved and well visited attraction in the village… and not just among chess enthusiasts! Cacek was granted honorary citizenship of Ströbeck in 1995.

Moving into the Town Hall

Quite quickly, the number of exhibits in the museum became too much for the space available in the Chess Museum. The old Town Hall on Schachplatz in Ströbeck, which had only seen partial use for many years, was offered as a new location for the attraction. After a long planning phase, the building was redesigned and renovated with the help of the Leader+ EU funding programme, becoming the Chess Museum we know today. Not only were large exhibition rooms built, an inner courtyard was constructed, which not only offered further
opportunities for the museum, rather also a place where children can let off steam and play with a large outdoor chess. Next to the exhibition room, there is a small chess library with a dual-purpose game and reading room, a media room, in which, among other things, films about Ströbeck can be shown. There is also a meeting room for interesting presentations about the history of chess, for holiday games or where you can warm up with a coffee and some cakes during the annual Christmas market held in the museum courtyard. A professional museum concept was drawn up for presenting the exhibitions themselves. This was done to reflect the ever-changing requirements of visitors at home and from abroad.

New Rooms and Opportunities

With financial support from the Halberstadt branch of the Sparkasse bank, the Ströbeck Chess Museum opened two new exhibition rooms on 17th May 2009. This meant that the museum could then present different special exhibitions on the topic of chess and, in particular, the history of chess in the village of Ströbeck.

History of the Chess Museum

The opening of the Chess Museum on 24th May 1991 allowed the villagers of Ströbeck to fulfil a wish they had held for a long time. On 1st January 2010, Ströbeck became part of the Halberstadt municipality, which also means that the Chess Museum is now part of the Halberstadt Urban Museum.
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altes Foto vom Schachmuseum als es noch Bauernhof war

How it All Began

Having a chess museum in Ströbeck was first discussed in the 1920s, but there was no fitting location in the village at that time. Ultimately, in the 1980s, both the derelict annexe of the chess tower and the tower itself were renovated for this very purpose. Our tireless supporters began the reconstruction works in 1985 so that they would be completed in time for the 1991 Chess and Village Festivals. Josef Cacek, retired chess teacher from the Dr Emanuel Lasker primary school, painstakingly put all the exhibitions for the museum together and presented them there upon completion. In the years that followed, he shared his extensive knowledge about the exhibition and recounted the history of Ströbeck’s unique chess traditions with enthusiasm. Under his leadership, the chess museum became a much loved and well visited attraction in the village… and not just among chess enthusiasts! Cacek was granted honorary citizenship of Ströbeck in 1995.

Moving into the Town Hall

Quite quickly, the number of exhibits in the museum became too much for the space available in the Chess Museum. The old Town Hall on Schachplatz in Ströbeck, which had only seen partial use for many years, was offered as a new location for the attraction. After a long planning phase, the building was redesigned and renovated with the help of the Leader+ EU funding programme, becoming the Chess Museum we know today. Not only were large exhibition rooms built, an inner courtyard was constructed, which not only offered further
opportunities for the museum, rather also a place where children can let off steam and play with a large outdoor chess. Next to the exhibition room, there is a small chess library with a dual-purpose game and reading room, a media room, in which, among other things, films about Ströbeck can be shown. There is also a meeting room for interesting presentations about the history of chess, for holiday games or where you can warm up with a coffee and some cakes during the annual Christmas market held in the museum courtyard. A professional museum concept was drawn up for presenting the exhibitions themselves. This was done to reflect the ever-changing requirements of visitors at home and from abroad.

New Rooms and Opportunities

With financial support from the Halberstadt branch of the Sparkasse bank, the Ströbeck Chess Museum opened two new exhibition rooms on 17th May 2009. This meant that the museum could then present different special exhibitions on the topic of chess and, in particular, the history of chess in the village of Ströbeck.

History of the

Chess Museum

The opening of the Chess Museum on 24th May 1991 allowed the villagers of Ströbeck to fulfil a wish they had held for a long time. On 1st January 2010, Ströbeck became part of the Halberstadt municipality, which also means that the Chess Museum is now part of the Halberstadt Urban Museum.
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